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WaPo Book Review: One Lucky Bastard: Tales from Tinseltown

WaPo Book Review: One Lucky Bastard: Tales from Tinseltown

private-signing-with-roger-moore

“Passion without pressure” is how Roger Moore describes the kissing technique he says in his (second) memoir that Lana Turner taught him in 1956, a century or so before he replaced Sean Connery as 007. Gross. This poor girl. Gross.

Roger Moore was 45 when he made his first debut as James Bond ­ — older than Sean Connery, who’d played the role in five films before he got fed up and abdicated, then…

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I expected that David Ayer, the writer of Training Day and the writer-director of End of Watch and Sabotage, would make a gritty World War II combat picture. But I was surprised how much an interest his film takes in the plight of civilian women in wartime, and its willingness to show American soldiers behaving badly during the “Good War.” My NPR review is here.

The Spoils of War: FURY, reviewed. I expected that David Ayer, the writer of Training Day and the writer-director of End of Watch…
Bringing Out the DC Dead

The flood of new words from me includes this Washington City Paper feature on DC Dead…

Bringing Out the DC Dead

The flood of new words from me includes this Washington City Paper feature on DC Dead…

Notes on Champ: Fetch Clay, Make Man and ABSOLUTELY! {perhaps}, reviewed.

Notes on Champ: Fetch Clay, Make Man and ABSOLUTELY! {perhaps}, reviewed.

Roscoe Orman and Eddie Ray Jackson as Stehin Fetchit and Muhammad Ali in "Fetch Clay, Make Man."

My review of Round House Theatre‘s strong production of Will Power‘s Fetch Clay, Make Man, a play about the unlikely friendship of Muhammad Ali and Stephin Fetchit, is in today’s Washington City Paper. I also review Constellation Theatre‘s update of a century-old Luigi Pirandello play, ABSOLUTELY! {perhaps}.

(more…)

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Mouth Almighty: I Am Ali, reviewed.

Mouth Almighty: I Am Ali, reviewed.

Muhammad Ali with his then-wife Veronica Porche and their daughter Hana in the 1970s.

“Muhammad Ali is our black Paul Bunyan,” wrote Budd Schulberg in the New York Times 16 years ago, “except that Bunyan’s superhuman exploits were fables and Ali’s are real.”

Muhammad Ali is already the subject of many, many fine books and documentaries. The distinguishing feature of the new documentary I Am Ali, which I reviewed for NPR today, is that filmmaker Clare Lewinswas given permission to…

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Where the Wild Things Are: Synetic’s The Island of Dr. Moreau, reviewed.

Where the Wild Things Are: Synetic’s The Island of Dr. Moreau, reviewed.

The inhabitants of Synetic Theater's "The Island of Dr. Moreau" (Johnny Shryock)

This acrobatic Moreau is a rich sensual experience, one that deflates at the end but not before it has vividly dramatized Wells’s big question: Is physical suffering at best irrelevant and at worst necessary? Can we evolve by teaching ourselves to ignore it? By way of demonstrating his answer, Moreau takes a glinting blade and slices a red trail through his own forearm, ignoring the pain like…

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My review of Ron Perlman’s autobiography Easy Street (The Hard Way) is in the Arts/Style section of this Sunday’s…

http://wp.me/p50Uc-2Z7

My review of Ron Perlman’s autobiography Easy Street (The Hard Way) is in the Arts/Style section of this Sunday’s…

Drive Harder

My review of Drive Hard, an ultra-low-budget Australian chase flick that is every bit as inspired as its name, is…

Drive Harder

My review of Drive Hard, an ultra-low-budget Australian chase flick that is every bit as inspired as its name, is…

All Men Are Not Created Equalizer

"A man can be an artist at anything," Christopher Walken said in Man on Fire, speaking of…

All Men Are Not Created Equalizer

"A man can be an artist at anything," Christopher Walken said in Man on Fire, speaking of…

My review of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company‘s production of David Adjmi‘s Marie Antoinette, starring the great Kimberly Gilbert, is in today’s Washington City Paper, available wherever finer alt-weeklies are given away for free.

Wig Time: Marie Antoinette, reviewed. My review of Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company’s production of David Adjmi’s Marie Antoinette, starring the great…